Gallatin Tennessee Art

Gallatin, Tennessee artist Micheal Hitt, named after his father Michael Hughes and his wife Mary, announced that Ragnar Sunset Tennessee, presented by Heritage Law Group, will come to the Tennessee Museum of Natural History in Nashville, Tennessee, on Saturday, April 8, 2017, to help JDRF. Artists have become part of the artwork created online, where artists can create a profile and upload artwork of themselves, their family, friends, family members or even their pets, all named after their father or mother. The artist has become a work of art of himself, his mother, her husband or dog, his friends or the parents of his dog, etc.

After a long time as a cartoonist at Opryland, he is now a full-time artist and has been asked to show his work online and at Gallatin Furniture in Gallatin, TN. Hitt is characterized by his unique style, which is reflected in his 20 years as an artist. A self-taught artist who leans towards oil, enamel and canvas, HITT defines his own style of art with his paintings, drawings and drawings of animals, birds, animals and people. After a brief stint at the Tennessee Museum of Natural History in Nashville, Tennessee, Hughes has exhibited his work online and has also shown it in a number of local galleries and galleries across the country. After a long period as a cartoonist for Opyland, he was asked to work and was shown in several galleries in Tennessee and around the world, but is now a full-time artist. Hughes has been working online with Gallinatown Furnitures in Gallinsville, Tennessee, and in New York since his first online exhibition in his home state of Georgia in 2010.

The NL & R operated the Nashville-Gallatin Interurban Railway, called the Bluegrass Line, which operated from 1912 to 1932. This unique large mural features images of a number of local landmarks as well as the history of the railroad and the city of Gallinsville. In 1982, an 18th-century painting by a border crosser was chosen as the centerpiece of a mural at the National Museum of Natural History in Nashville, Tennessee. The right mural focuses on the connection to Gallatin, including the construction and operation of Nashville's first light rail line in the early 20th century.

Residents were able to board at Depot Square after the 1858 opening and were part of the Nashville-Gallatin Interurban Railway (NL & R). Residents could get into depot Square before it closed in 1924 and played a key role in the construction of Nashville's first light rail line, the Bluegrass Line, which opened on 18 September 1958.

Nashville and Memphis had public schools before, but Nashville Female Academy, founded in 1816 in Nashville, was far from the exception. The arrow points to Stagecoach Road, which stretches from Knoxville to Nashville and then to the Tennessee River. Nashville Female Academy, located at the intersection of Nashville Road and Tennessee Street, north of Depot Square, was the city's first public school.

The left side of the mural bears the name of Milton "Hannibul" Smith, a long-time railway driver who took over the company in 1884, and his wife.

The painting, which David commissioned for Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, is titled "Daniel Boone and the Settlers led by Daniel Boone. The work features Boone, his wife Mary and their children, as well as other members of the Boone family. In 1775, Cumberlands Gap transformed into an awe-inspiring mural on display at the Cumberland Gap Visitor Center.

I love that the post covers the Christian cross motif, which plays well with the red stars and blooms, the artist added. Left of the panther is a strawberry he made for the Strawberry Festival in Middle Tennessee. Behind the guitar is another strawberry that honors Portland's strawberry heritage and has a 75-year history.

Sarah Bahnson Chapman, access from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Knoxville, Tennessee, Nashville, TN, USA and the Library of Congress.

Sarah Bahnson Chapman, access from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Knoxville, Tennessee, Nashville, TN, USA and the Library of Congress. She is a retired curator and member of the board of trustees of the Tennessee Historical Society and a former curator of art at the University of Tennessee.

She graduated from Gallatin High School and earned her Bachelor of Science from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and her Master of Science in English from Vanderbilt University. She has taught art classes for children and adults in the Volunteer State and served on the board of trustees of the Tennessee Historical Society and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Nashville.

In 1810, Mrs. Tarpley of the Female Seminary in Nashville advertised that she would teach young women in her class to read, write and sing. Buds Have Blooming Flowers, "written in 1859, was composed and published as a song dedicated to graduates of Nashville Women's Academy, as well as figures from the Tennessee Historical Society and the Museum of Contemporary Art.

More About Gallatin

More About Gallatin